Self-reliance and happiness begin when we realize the extent of this false and devastating dream; when we understand that no one can care about us better and that we are alone responsible for our lives; and when we begin to learn effective methods of doing these things ourselves.

Self-reliance is not only the belief that you can handle things and achieve success, but it’s also more than this. It’s the courage to listen to your inner impulses in order to get a hint about the kind of success you really desire. Does it mean getting indoctrinated by yourself?

And not listening to something or someone outside of yourself to get an idea of what you should be, do, or possess. And when we begin to learn to read and understand these internal “signals correctly and follow our intuition, we can begin to trust ourselves and not to follow the drums of another person.”

How Can Setting Goals Help Me Become Self-Reliant?

Self-Reliant grows from these healthy learning experiences. Through risk, we learn how to solve problems, as well as how to deal effectively with disappointment and failure. When we learn these skills, our experiences in life are successful, and it produces confidence that we can count on ourselves to experiment, to solve new problems we face, to reduce our disappointment and correct our mistakes. When we know these things, we know that we can take care of ourselves.

How Can Setting Goals Help Me Become Self-Reliant?

Internal role model.

When you develop self-reliance and independence within yourself, you are also developing role models that enable you to choose the right friends and your right colleague. Your interaction with yourself is a role model for all your other relationships. For example, if you criticize yourself, again and again, you are more likely to remain critical of it, because it is familiar.

Likewise, self-reliance and independence in yourself also help you see it in others. When you have a responsible relationship with yourself, you develop an internal relationship model to use as a basis for your friendships and intimate relationships with others.

As you become more experienced in making friends, your circle of good friends grows – beginning with your relationship with yourself, expanding into a number of new friends, and ultimately grows into a supportive “family” of your choice that enhances your independence and independence.

Learning.

As a child, our natural curiosity is strong. Indeed, young children are small “learning machines.” Their whole being focused on learning through their five senses. Research shows that children are “employed” through situations that they can learn. Their bodies produce hormones such as adrenaline and the natural endorphins that produce “high natural” – the body’s own system of incentives and rewards for learning.

When children experience a new experience, as long as they feel safe and not threatened, young children are very eager to explore and learn. Safe young children are drawn to bright colors, new sounds and new experiences, as they find the keys to your troublesome car wonderful.

For a child who has supportive, loving and functional parents, the world is a fun and safe place, learning is exciting and joyful. Children who feel safe have to delight in learning to venture, start taking small risks, and start acting independently of their parents. In the face of these risks, under the supervision and support of parents at the beginning, and increasingly independently as the child ages, the skills necessary for self-reliance are learned.

How Can Setting Goals Help Me Become Self-Reliant?

Independence grows from these healthy learning experiences. Through risk, we learn how to solve problems, as well as how to deal effectively with disappointment and failure. When we learn these skills, our experiences in life are successful, and it produces confidence that we can count on ourselves to experiment, to solve new problems we face, to reduce our disappointment and correct our mistakes. When we know these things, we know that we can take care of ourselves.

Scared and unsafe children, on the other hand, depend on the adults around them. Their world is extremely unsafe for risk-taking, and they look to others to solve their problems and take care of their feelings. Not realizing your motivations, feelings, desires, and inner dialogue makes you out of control and you cannot know how to please yourself. It is really as if you don’t have your life, as if someone else should manage it.

Internal role model.

When you develop self-reliance and independence within yourself, you are also developing role models that enable you to choose the right friends and your right colleague. Your interaction with yourself is a role model for all your other relationships. For example, if you criticize yourself, again and again, you are more likely to remain critical of it, because it is familiar.

Likewise, self-reliance and independence in yourself also help you see it in others. When you have a responsible relationship with yourself, you develop an internal relationship model to use as a basis for your friendships and intimate relationships with others.

As you become more experienced in making friends, your circle of good friends grows – starting from your relationship with yourself, expanding into a number of new friends, and eventually growing into a supportive “family” of your choice that enhances your independence and independence.

Understand, perceive and break down the habit of dependence

How Can Setting Goals Help Me Become Self-Reliant?

Reliance is bondage by mutual agreement. It underestimates the dependent person and the one that is counted on, as both sides are equally lacking self-reliance, and such a relationship thrives on mutual exploitation.

The worst and most ominous aspect of dependence is that when you think you trust in someone else, you really are! You neglect to develop the self-reliance needed to confront and solve your problems.

One of the sure signs of dependence is that you are accustomed to looking to others as more important, valuable and worthy. And the moment you start comparing yourself with anyone, expose yourself to psychological slavery.

The habit of relying on others is so deeply embedded in some individuals that they waive every personal right to them for the sake of another person, or other philosophy. They feel they will be safe if they can find a person, institution, or philosophy that is responsible for their happiness. Of course, this includes the luxury of having someone or something blamed for any failure.

A dependent person relies on others to put himself at the mercy of those around him. Because he thinks others are more clever and smarter than him, he always looks for someone to rely on when he faces a new problem. And because he is subject to those who depend on him, their advice becomes orders that he feels compelled to implement. Often there is more than one “mentor”, so he is always in a state of rupture and exhaustion while trying to determine the advice of who follows.

Read the following and pay close attention to it.

Nobody can ever let you down unless you rely on it in some way.

No one can hurt your feelings, or make you unhappy, lonely, angry, or frustrated unless you are relied upon to provide you with luxury, inspiration, love, or motivation.

A self-reliant person does not need to find a reliable professor. He is able to face life’s challenges with confidence and strength by looking at each situation in light of reality. He sees things as they are, not as he likes to be, and refuses to allow the resistance to dominate his life.

Once you possess and develop the capacity for self-reliance, you do not have to procrastinate, flee, or avoid what confronts you because you have confidence in your ability to face every situation of life with confidence, certainty, calmness and equanimity. You are not worried because you know you have total control.

You are not isolated from your source of strength. You do not need repeated doses of motivation and inspiration from others in order to do what you should do. Instead, live life while realizing that the inner strength in your depths is greater and greater than any problem you face

Emotional competence.

The emotional tools needed to free yourself from dependency. Being responsible is being able to make effective decisions and options for yourself, weighing alternatives, assessing ethical dilemmas and problem-solving. When a problem arises, the independent person has acquired the skills he needs to face it directly, learn as much as possible about it, study many options, evaluate the potential outcome of each option, and perhaps seek advice and advice before arriving at a decision.

As a self-reliant independent person, you can ask for help directly, but you remain responsible for the amount and type of assistance you accept and come to clear agreements about what is expected in return.

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